Rasboras Guide – What Are They, Their Types, And Care Guide

Do you know that if your water is not in the desired PH range as per your fish, it can cause some problems like Algae Growth, Coral Growth, damage to the health of your fish, etc. We would highly recommend getting this API Water Testing Kit on Amazon.com, so you’re always aware of the pH level of your aquarium.

Rasboras are probably some of the favorite aquarium fish. They do not only look nice, but they are extremely active and can give life to an empty tank.

Many beginners choose them as their first fish, as they are easy to maintain and pleasant to watch.

A close-up of a fish

Description automatically generated with medium confidence

Check out other fishes that are easy to maintain and perfect for beginners.

Although there are dozens of types of Rasboras, not all of them are commonly found in tanks. However, they all have the same main requirements, so you can hold different types in the same tank.

Types of Rasboras

Here are some of the most popular types of Rasboras:

Types of Rasbora

BlackLine Rasbora

If you ever went into a pet shop, you probably noticed this fish. Originally it is found in polluted waters in Asia, but it can live a healthy life in any tank.

The name comes from the black line that runs from the head to the tail of the fish. You can also find this type under the name “Red-spotted Rasbora” because it has a red spot next to its tail.

This fish is suitable for small tanks and it can be held with other peaceful fish not trying to bite its fins.

Information ChartBlackLine Rasbora
Scientific Name: Rasbora Borapetensis
Family: Cyprinidae
Care Level: Beginner
Temperament: Very peaceful
Color: A dark brown or black mid-lateral stripe on silverfish
Lifespan: Up to 7 Years
Size: 1.5-1.75 inches
Diet: Carnivorous, micropellets/flakes, live and frozen meals are provided.
Minimum Tank Size: 10 Gallons
Temperature: 70-82 Degrees Fahrenheit
Water Conditions: Temperatures between 22 and 26 °C, pH range of 6.5 to 7.0, and water hardness (DH) of 5 to 12.
Tank Mate Compatibility: Get along well with other communal fish of similar size. They can be kept with other rasboras, small tetras, croaking, sparkling, and chocolate gouramis, heavenly danios, pentazocine barbs, guppies, and platies, depending on the species.

Clown Rasbora

In nature, these fish lives in slow-moving water, which means a large empty tank is not exactly suitable for them. To make sure they live a healthy life, you should raise them in a heavily planted tank with plenty of spaces to hide.

If you want to reproduce this type of Rasbora, you have to decrease the light to a minimum and bring into the tank as many dense plants as possible; this will make them feel like they are in their natural habitat and it will provide a safe place for the babies.

The Clown Rasbora has an orange body with black spots, and it is often confused with Harlequin Rasbora.

Information ChartClown Rasbora
Scientific Name: Rasbora kalochroma
Family: Cyprinidae
Care Level: Beginner-Intermediate
Temperament: Peaceful
Color: base of pink to red scales
Lifespan: 3 to 5 years
Size: Up to 4 Inches
Diet: Clown Rasboras are marvelously unfussy omnivores
Minimum Tank Size: Up to 60 gallons
Temperature: 25-28 deg C (77-82 deg F)
Water Conditions: Soft, acidic water is essential. pH: 5.0-7.0, dH: up to 8 degrees.
Tank Mate Compatibility: Soft Water community

Harlequin Rasbora

Unlike the previous type, this one is generally found in clean waters. It needs a large tank, preferably with a lot of plants to lead its calm life with other fish.

It has a black, triangular-shaped black dot right next to its tail, this being the most recognizable particularity of this type. The body is orange but not as large as the Clown Rasbora.

The best way to keep these fish is in a large schooling group to swim together and feel safe in a large group.

Information ChartHarlequin Rasbora
Scientific Name: Trigonostigma heteromorpha
Family: Cyprinidae
Care Level: Easy
Temperament: Very peaceful
Color: Golden Orange Color
Lifespan: five to eight years
Size: 2 to 3 inches
Diet: Omnivores
Minimum Tank Size: 10 Gallons of tank
Temperature: 22 °C to 27 °C (72 °F to 81 °F)
Water Conditions: pH should be between 5.0 and 7.0, and KH should be between 1 and 3 degrees (20 ppm to 50 ppm)
Tank Mate Compatibility: Cardinal tetras, bettas, neon tetras, small barbs, dwarf gouramis, danios, other small rasboras, and cory catfish are all acceptable tankmates.
Check out other schooling fishes that are perfect for your tank.

Scissortail Rasbora

If you love Rasbora, but you want them in the larger version, then the Scissortail Rasbora will be a pleasant surprise. It is probably the largest variety and it can reach up to 3 inches.

You can recognize it by its silver body and small spots on its tail fins. Don’t be fooled by its size; this fish is as peaceful as any other Rasbora and it is not a good idea to keep it in a tank with aggressive fish that will attack all the time.

Check out some of the more aggressive freshwater fishes.

The preferred food is fish flakes, insects, and as a treat, small crustaceans.

Information ChartScissortail Rasbora
Scientific Name: Rasbora trilineata
Family: Cyprinidae
Care Level: Beginner
Temperament: Peaceful
Color: shimmering silver
Lifespan: Up to 5 Years
Size: 3.5 inches
Diet: Carnivores
Minimum Tank Size: 20 Gallon
Temperature: 73-77°F
Water Conditions: Temperature must be kept at 77 to 82 degrees Fahrenheit and half-filled with somewhat acidic water (6.0 to 6.5). (25 to 28 Celsius)
Tank Mate Compatibility: Almost all tetra species, danios, gouramis, and even some larger fish like angelfish and discus, make excellent tankmates.

Dwarf Rasbora

This is one of the smallest Rasboras, less than one inch, but also one of the most active ones. If you have a group of Dwarf Rasboras in your tank, you will never be bored!

They will spend their time chasing each other and making your aquarium look more alive than ever. It can have a silver or orange body and black spots everywhere.

It is extremely sensitive to dirty water, so pay special attention to this aspect if you decide to bring Dwarf Rasboras. Apart from this, provide various hiding places that will not make the fish feel exposed in front of other aggressive species.

Information ChartDwarf Rasbora
Scientific Name: Boraras maculatus
Family: Minnows and Carps
Care Level: Beginner
Temperament: Peaceful
Color: Ruby red color
Lifespan: 3 to 5 years
Size: 1 inch
Diet: Carnivore
Minimum Tank Size: 8 to 10 Gallons
Temperature: between 68 and 82 degrees
Water Conditions: very soft and very acidic. They are frequently found in places with a pH of less than 4.0.
Tank Mate Compatibility Dwarf Shrimp

Rasboras are great!

No matter what kind of Rasbora you decide to keep, it is important to prepare the tank and limit the number of fish. Since you have so many types to choose from, you can easily keep only Rasboras in your tank.

In this way, you will have a colorful and diverse population of fish and you will be sure at all times they will not hurt each other.

If you want to reproduce them, you just have to put the couple in a separate tank and create the proper conditions for them to breed.

Soon enough you will find dozens of small Rasboras that will grow to populate your tank and help you learn more about these wonderful creatures.

What Is The Species Called Rasboras?

Rasbora is a kind of fish or a fish genus belonging to the Cyprinidae family. Their natural habitats are freshwater locations in Southeast Asia and China. Only one species, R. Gerlach, is known from an old specimen supposedly from Africa; however, the authenticity of the location of their origin is disputed. They are small, reaching up to 17 centimeters in length, however, most species do not exceed 10 centimeters, and many feature a dark horizontal stripe.

Several species carry the common English name rasbora like Brevibora, Boraras, Megarasbora, Metzia, Microdevario, Microrasbora, Rasboroides, Rasbosoma, Sawbwa, Trigonopoma, and Trigonostigma. Previously, some of these genera were grouped under the Rasbora genus.

Different Types Of Rasboras

#1 Galaxy Rasbora

Galaxy Rasboras, also known as the Celestial Pearl Danio, lives up to its moniker. This fish’s base is a deep blue color that resembles the night sky. They glisten in the sunlight, showcasing their signature cosmic appearance. For a striking contrast, the fins take on a brilliant red color. Black striations accent the red. Galaxy Rasboras inhabit warm, shallow ponds in the wild. They thrive in tanks and aquariums of natural decor and water conditions comparable to those found in the wild.

The Galaxy Rasbora spend most of their time at the bottom of the water stream. The Rasbora should be provided with some lowering pellets to ensure their access to food.

Information ChartGalaxy Rasbora
Scientific Name: Danio Margaritatus
Family: Cyprinidae
Care Level: Beginner
Temperament: Peaceful
Color: A Deep blue color that resembles the night sky
Lifespan: Between 3 and 5 years
Size: 1 Inch
Diet: Live baby brine shrimp, krill, daphnia, Moina, white worms, and grindal worms
Minimum Tank Size: 10 Gallon
Temperature: 73°F to 80°F
Water Conditions: pH Levels: 6.5 to 7.5. Water Hardness: 2 - 10 dKH
Tank Mate Compatibility: Schooling fish

#2 Chili Rasbora

The Chili Rasboras are colorful schooling fishes that tend to brighten up your aquarium. These little fishes prefer being with their school of fishes and rely on social activities to stay healthy and active. Until they become more at ease and comfortable in their surroundings, they may appear shy. You can admire their gorgeous colors when they swim about the tank. The fish’s body is a mixture of pink and red hues. The stripes mainly consist of two vivid red and dark black colors traversing the length of the body.

Chili Rasboras can sometimes be fussy when it comes to water. You can source them from mineral-poor natural blackwater ponds.

Information ChartChili Rasbora
Scientific Name: Boraras Brigittae
Family: Minnows and Carps
Care Level: Beginner
Temperament: Peaceful
Color: A mixture of pink and red hues
Lifespan: 6 to 8 years
Size: About 0.7 inches
Diet: Omnivorous, but prefer more carnivorous diet
Minimum Tank Size: 5 gallons
Temperature: 68°F to 82° Fahrenheit
Water Conditions: GH: 1-2, KH: 3-12 dKH, pH: 4.0-7.0. With a pH as low as 4.0, blackwater streams, pools, and peat swamps can be found.
Tank Mate Compatibility: Other docile micro fish Rasboras, minnows, tetras, and dwarf cichlids are examples of small cyprinids.

#3 Lambchop Rasbora

The Lambchop Rasbora is a strange tiny fish possessing a calm personality and is group-oriented. It is ideal for putting them in clusters of at least six fishes. These fishes spend more time playing and less time hiding in a larger group. The intriguing moniker inspires the distinctive mark on its body, and it also appears like a lamb chop. This mark is comparable to the crescent-shaped patch on the Harlequin Rasbora that runs from the dorsal fin to the base of its caudal fin.

It creates a striking contrast to the fish’s otherwise simple body. They are brilliant red or orange. There is a chance you will notice some yellow as well.

Lambchop Rasboras is a simple fish to maintain. They are not picky about diet, but they require varied diets to breed.

Information ChartLambchop Rasbora
Scientific Name: Trigonostigma Espei
Family: Cyprinidae
Care Level: Beginner
Temperament: Peaceful
Color: Bold red and orange
Lifespan: Between 3 to 5 years
Size: 1.5 Inches
Diet: Omnivore, thriving on a balanced diet of meat-based foods and vegetation
Minimum Tank Size: 10 Gallons
Temperature: 23 – 28 °C
Water Conditions: The water is very clear and is tinted a bright blue/green color, pH: 5.5 – 7.5, Hardness: 18 – 179 ppm
Tank Mate Compatibility: Catfish, Dwarf Cichlids, Livebearers, Loaches, Tetras and, Snails

#4 Brilliant Rasbora

The Brilliant Rasbora is another kind of rasbora that thrives in acidic water settings. These fishes are found in blackwater streams and peat swamps in the wild. They can survive in pH levels as low as 3. The food preferences of the Brilliant Rasbora are insects, worms, and shrimps. They are called tiny predators in the aquatic world.

They usually eat dry foods in captivity. However, it should not be their sole source of nutrition. You should also feed them plenty of protein-rich live or frozen foods. It will both keep them healthy and bring out their natural hues.

Information ChartBrilliant Rasbora
Scientific Name: Rasbora Einthovenii
Family: Cyprinidae
Care Level: Beginner-Intermediate
Temperament: Peaceful
Color: The golden-green body which features a gold stripe along its lateral line which is bordered in black
Lifespan: 5 years but can live up to 8 years
Size: 3.5 inches
Diet: These micro predators eat insects, larvae, and crustaceans
Minimum Tank Size: 30 Gallons
Temperature: 72°F – 78°F
Water Conditions: They exist in acidic conditions, and are found in blackwater streams associated with peat swamps, and may survive in pH levels as low as 3.0.
Tank Mate Compatibility: Schooling and shoaling fishes - Tetras, Livebearers, Danios, Gouramis, Guppies, Platies, Corydoras, Catfish, Dwarf Cichlids, and Loaches

#4 Phoenix Rasbora

The Phoenix Rasbora is a highly sorted and well-behaved species to be kept in community aquariums. Several aquarists love these fishes for their striking color and nano-sized bodies. The fish has a ruby red appearance when viewed from a distance. Upon closer study, you will notice a plethora of lovely intricacies, such as black spots with orange, yellow, and red borders. You can also notice these hues on its fins. Due to their nano-size and peaceful demeanor, you can safely keep it with dwarf fishes.

To help them feel comfortable and at ease in their surroundings, the phoenix Barbora must be kept a minimum in a school of 6 and a maximum of 20 fish. Their schooling behavior is a major highlight in any peaceful aquarium community. That’s why it’s popular among aquarists worldwide.

Information ChartPhoenix Rasbora
Scientific Name: Boraras Merah
Family: Cyprinidae
Care Level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Color: Silver, black marks on a red and orange body
Lifespan: Maximum 7 years
Size: 0.5-0.8 inch
Diet: Usually carnivore, but can be omnivorous when domesticated
Minimum Tank Size: 10 Gallon Tank is required
Temperature: 20 – 28 Degree Celsius
Water Conditions: Acidic water, a suitable pH level for 4-7. The alkaline level within 3-12 dKH
Tank Mate Compatibility: Sucker Fish, Danio Margaritatus, Chocolate Gourami, Kuhli Loach, Dwarf Rasbora, Croaking Gourami, Sparkling Gourami, Five band Barb, Pygmy Corydoras (other cory catfishes), Fishes of Borara genus, Small Tetra fishes

#5 Emerald Eye Rasbora

The emerald eye rasbora, also known as eyespot rasbora is a small learning fish with a beautiful appearance. From its eyes to tails, the emerald eye rasbora fish features a  gorgeous iridescent green pattern. These little rasboras are quiet and compact, making them an excellent choice for the soft water community.

Information ChartEmerald Eye Rasbora
Scientific Name: Brevibora Dorsiocellata
Family: Cyprinidae
Care Level: Easy to handle
Temperament: They are Peaceful
Color: Gorgeous iridescent green patterning
Lifespan: Around three to five years
Size: 1.5 inches
Diet: Carnivorous, provide micropellets/flakes, live and frozen food
Minimum Tank Size: 10 Gallon Tank
Temperature: 68-77°F
Water Conditions: Streams and other sources of water with an acidic pH, at least some of which are found in peat swamp forest ecosystems
Tank Mate Compatibility: Such as other rasboras, small loaches, smaller gourami species, characins, or Corydoras

#6 Green Kubotai Rasbora

The Green Kubotai Rasbora is a miniature shoaling fish, ideal for a planted aquarium. They can be put together in groups of seven or more several fishes in one tank or another with a peaceful nano community. They are sensitive, and they are not usually suitable for a community tank because of their sensitivity. Since they are timid, they should be kept alone with other gentle breeds. It requires a lot of plants and less brightness in its tanks.

They come from various other places in Thailand and Myanmar’s south. This means these fishes prefer a stony bottom with quiet to moderate water flow and abundant flora, debris, and foliage.

Information ChartGreen Kubotai Rasbora
Scientific Name: Microdevario Kubotai
Family: Cyprinidae
Care Level: Very Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Color: Neon Green
Lifespan: 3-7 years
Size: 0.75 inches
Diet: Omnivorous, feed micro pellets, flakes, and live/frozen food
Minimum Tank Size: 15 Gallons
Temperature: 68-80°F
Water Conditions: Hardness of 18-179 ppm, the temperature of 68-80.6°F (20-27°C), pH of 6.0-7.0, and temperature of 68-80.6°F (20-27°C)
Tank Mate Compatibility: Compatible with other peaceful community fish such as rasboras, tetras, and danios

#7 Least Rasbora

The least rasboras fishes are available in a variety of hues. A thick black ring runs the length of the fish on all of them. Their little stature gives them their name. Because of their black markings, they are referred to as exclamation point rasboras. The Least is an incredibly little fish. They rarely grow to be greater than 0.6 inches in length as adults. The too small size gives them the distinction of being the tiniest Cyprinid, narrowly edging out the dwarf rasbora.

Least rasboras live in some of the darkest waterways in the wild. This type of Rasbora has no idea how to deal with the lights and bright things. Floating plants are a must-have in any aquarium with them.

Information ChartLeast Rasbora
Scientific Name: Boraras Urophthalmoides
Family: Cyprinidae
Care Level: Easy to Moderate
Temperament: Peaceful
Color: In a dark-water aquascape, electric red-orange colors
Lifespan: 4-8 years
Size: 1 Inches
Diet: Omnivore
Minimum Tank Size: 15 Gallons
Temperature: 68-80.6°F (20-27°C)
Water Conditions: 6.0-7.0 pH
Tank Mate Compatibility: Sundadanio, Microdevario, Eirmotus, Danionella, Trigonostigma, Pygmy Corydoras

Natural Habitat and Origin

Rasboras can be found all over Southeast Asia, including Southeast China. Even during the rainy season, they can be found in floodplains and gently running forest streams. They enjoy shallow water with so many aquatic plants and herbs. The tannins generated by leaves and other organic debris contaminate water, and the pH in some ecosystems can be as low as 4. Due to overhanging vegetation, light is typically dimmed.

Rasboras are calm fish, and most kinds of them get along with other communal fish of uniform shape. Depending on the species, they can be kept with several other rasboras, small betta fish, croaking, glittering, chocolate domotics, heavenly danios, pentazocine barbs, and tropical fish.  

Dwarf rasboras, such as those of the genus Boraras, are best kept in various aquariums, although they are among the types of fishes you may keep alongside dwarf freshwater crabs due to their small size. Before purchasing any new fish for your aquarium, you should consult an aquarium professional.

Water Parameters

There are certain rasboras, particularly those in the genus Boraras, are gathered in the wild where the water is soft and slightly acidic, the bulk of aquarium species available today are reared in water with a greater pH and alkalinity than their natural environment.

Water Temperature

The water temperature should be between 75 and 80 degrees Fahrenheit for these fish.

If the aquarium is housed in a room with a temperature below 75°, an Aqueon Aquarium Heater should be used to maintain the proper temperature. Fish were taken in the wild like a pH of 5.0 to 7.0 and a KH of 1 to 3 degrees (20 ppm to 50 ppm).

pH Level

pH should be between 6.8 and 7.8, alkalinity between 3 and 8 degrees (50 ppm to 140 ppm).

Water Hardness 

Rasboras likes to live in a water with hardness upto 12dGH.

Rasbora Tank Landscape

Rasboras thrive in well-planted aquariums and thrive in groups of six or more. This fish lives in a well-maintained and decorated aquarium with a dark substrate that imitates its natural habitat. The filter should produce a moderate current to mimic the slow-moving streams in which they reside. Aquarists must cover the aquarium with a lid and ensure they don’t jump out of the water.

Feeding Rasboras

Most rasboras are micro-predators, which means they eat small insects, larvae, parasites, and shrimp in the wild.

Aqueon Tropical Specks, Color Foils, Tropical Particles, and Shrimp Microbeads are ideal for them. Crumble dry meals to match their jaw area for absolutely tiny creatures. Frozen and live items are used as snacks or aid in breeding. To get the best results, rotate their meal once or twice a day, and just give them what they can eat in Two to Three minutes.

How To Keep And Maintain An Aquarium Of Rasboras?

You must maintain a reasonably large family, although they do not require the massive tanks that some cyprinids do. To keep the rasboras comfortable, you should try to replicate their natural habitat as precisely as possible. This necessitates the upkeep of a thickly vegetated aquarium. Create a dynamic background along the border of your tank, but leave free swimming space in the center. If keeping the illumination modest is an issue, you can make a compromise by adding drifting vegetation to your tank.

What Are The Health Concerns Of Rasboras?

If you decide to go with wild-caught rasboras, make sure to select healthy and active ones. Look for rasboras with active body movements and avoid lethargic fishes that do not appear interested in food. Another issue with wild-caught rasboras is their illness potential. Like the captive-born fish, fish exported inappropriately overseas by wholesalers frequently develop one or more conditions such as Some Spot Disease and Velvet Disease. The White Spot Disease is also known among aquarists as Ich. In this disease, your rasboras develop white blisters all over their bodies due to the ciliate protozoan Ichthyophthirius multifiliis. The fish may even perish if you do not treat it.

Oodinium pilularis and Oodinium limneticum are two probable origins of the velvet disease. Both are dangerous and generate fine gold dots on your fish’s body. If left unresolved or untreated, your rasbora may develop respiratory and breathing problems.

What Are The Health Concerns Of Rasboras?

If you decide to go with wild-caught rasboras, make sure to select healthy and active ones. Look for rasboras with active body movements and avoid lethargic fishes that do not appear interested in food. Another issue with wild-caught rasboras is their illness potential. Like the captive-born fish, fish exported inappropriately overseas by wholesalers frequently develop one or more conditions such as Some Spot Disease and Velvet Disease. The White Spot Disease is also known among aquarists as Ich. In this disease, your rasboras develop white blisters all over their bodies due to the ciliate protozoan Ichthyophthirius multifiliis. The fish may even perish if you do not treat it.

Oodinium pilularis and Oodinium limneticum are two probable origins of the velvet disease. Both are dangerous and generate fine gold dots on your fish’s body. If left unresolved or untreated, your rasbora may develop respiratory and breathing problems.

How And What To Feed To Rasboras?

Most rasboras are micro-predators, which means they eat small insects, larvae, parasites, and shrimp in the wild.

Aqueon Tropical Specks, Color Foils, Tropical Particles, and Shrimp Microbeads are ideal for them. Crumble dry meals to match their jaw area for absolutely tiny creatures. Frozen and live items are used as snacks or aid in breeding. To get the best results, rotate their meal once or twice a day, and just give them what they can eat in Two to Three minutes.

Breeding Rasboras

Rasboras Breeding Level

Rasboras are notoriously hard to breed. 

How Many Different Kinds Of Rasboras Can Be Kept In A Single Aquarium?

Rasboras are excellent nano fish for aquariums with limited space. Because most of the smaller species are active fish despite their small size, a minimum tank size of roughly Ten gallons is mandatory. Because rasboras are schooling fish, they need at least six companions to be happy. More is always preferable, but six is a good start. As a general rule, the smaller the Rasboras are, the more pals they should have.

Facts About Rasboras

  • Rasboras are active freshwater tropical fishes. 
  • They are known to have a protruding lower jaw. 
  • Rasboras shimmers in light, which gives it a cosmic look. 

Are Rasboras Right for You?

If you want to keep an attractive looking fish in your tank that is easy to care for, Rasboras should be your choice. This fish species likes to live in a large school that can make your aquarium look vibrant. 

So, it can be said that Rasboras are right for you! 

FAQs

How many Rasboras should be kept together?

In a tank, you can keep around 7 Rasboras fish. When kept in community, this fish species tends to be less stressed. 

Do Rasboras lay eggs?

Yes, Rasboras lay eggs. But a Rasbora carrying eggs does not mean that it’s pregnant. 

Do Rasboras like current?

Yes, this fish specie likes to swim into in current. 

Conclusion

Rasboras are some of the cutest, most colorful, and most energetic fish to have in your home aquarium. When they are in school with other members of their species, they are usually very calm and content. They generate stunning hues when they are healthy and well-fed. As you have seen all of the different sorts of rasboras, it is time to choose your favorite. Everyone has their tastes, and the appearance of one species may appeal to you more than that of others. When it comes to fishkeeping, this is all part of the pleasure. It is never boring to see a fish you like swimming about in your house. If you can’t choose between a few, you can always keep them all together in a larger tank. Many rasbora species get along well, so a community tank would be a better option.

However, there are a variety of these species, and not all of them are suitable for novices. However, the majority are suitable for beginners and are quite simple to maintain.

Leave a Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.